DL Fowler's Blog

Right Makes Might

On February 27, 1860, Abraham Lincoln closed his address at New York City’s Cooper Union with the following words that turned an age old phrase on its head.

Neither let us be slandered from our duty by false accusations against us, nor frightened from it by menaces of destruction to the Government nor of dungeons to ourselves. Let us have faith that right makes might, and in that faith, let us, to the end, dare to do our duty as we understand it.

His speech at Cooper Union set him on track to win the Republican nomination for president. The world view he capsulized in this quote is what fueled his greatness.

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Have the Good Old Days Returned?

Posted in Abraham Lincoln, Abuse, Civil War, Psychopaths, Research, Slavery, Uncategorized, US History by DLFowler on May 22, 2016

Today is the 160th anniversary of the caning of Senator Charles Sumner. It’s not far-fetched to imagine that kind of thing happening today.

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What Is History?

History is a collection of stories designed to teach and motivate societies toward common goals and values. These historical narratives can be different from the contemporary narratives that society’s leaders employ to call people to action. Nonetheless, by narrowing or broadening the perspective from which historical events are viewed a dominant group within society can create the perception that their current agenda is rooted in treasured traditions.
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Abraham Lincoln’s Core Principle

Posted in Inspiration, Lincoln, Lincoln Raw, Lincoln's Psychology, Research, Themes, Writing by DLFowler on December 12, 2013

This will be short.

I grew up thinking Abraham Lincoln had a moral compass that always pointed North and made him superior to the rest of us. That he was passionate about Liberty and Justice for All, while we are mostly focused on liberty and justice for us. As I sit here doing one more pre-publication round of edits on Lincoln Raw—the human side of history I came across a much ignored excerpt from a speech he gave during his one term in Congress. It pretty well sums up the guiding principle that was his North Star for most of his life. 

In the early days of the world, the Almighty said to the first of our race, “In the sweat of thy face shalt thou eat bread.” Since then, no good thing has been enjoyed by us without the necessity of labor. But it has so happened in all ages of the world that some have labored and others have, without labor, enjoyed a large proportion of the fruits. This is wrong. To secure to each laborer the whole product of his labor is a most worthy object of any good government.

When I say “most of his life” I don’t  suggest that he ever abandoned this principle. What I mean is that this principle led him to a new, higher law in his later years. It was this new understanding that led the world in, and still leads us in the unfinished business of, re-defining Liberty and Justice for All.

What are your thoughts? Go ahead and leave a comment.